How to Use Your School of Information Account
Computing Resources >> Tutorials >> Getting Started >> How to Use Your School of Information Account 

Introduction

Signing Up

Accessing Your Account on a PC
Part 1: Logging in
Part 2: Changing your password
Part 3: Resetting your password
Part 4: Storing files
Part 5: Creating a public_html folder
Part 6: Logging out

Accessing Your Account on a Mac
Part 1: Logging in
Part 2: Changing your password
Part 3: Resetting your password
Part 4: Creating a public_html folder
Part 5: Logging out
Part 6: Using Fugu to store files

How to Access Your School of Information Email Account
Pine
Webmail
Eudora
Mozilla Mail
Other Options

Putting a Web Page Online

Evaluate this Tutorial

 

How to Access Your School of Information Email Account

You can access your School of Information email account in several ways. Before deciding which email account is best for you, you should ask yourself the following questions:

  • How fast is the Internet connection you normally use?
  • Do you check your email from one computer, or multiple computers?
  • Do you prefer an email client with a comprehensive graphical user interface (a more interactive, point and click environment), or are you comfortable in an all text-based environment?

Your answers to those questions will determine which email client will best serve your needs. Before we learn about different email clients, let’s first learn about two different ways that email clients access email.

The first is called IMAP (Internet Messaging Access Protocol). Email clients that are configured with IMAP check email without downloading your messages to your computer’s hard drive. All of your messages are retained on the server. What does that mean, exactly? Well, for one thing, you are able to access your old email messages, regardless of which computer you are using to check your email. Also, anything that’s retained on the server is backed up on a regular basis. Examples of IMAP email applications are Pine and Webmail.

The second is called POP (Post Office Protocol). POP applications download email directly to your home machine. There are both pros and cons to using a POP email application. If you are on a slow dial-up connection, POP allows you to download all of your messages and read them after terminating your connection. Also, it prevents your mailbox on the server from becoming too full by transferring messages from the server to your home machine. On the downside, however, is the fact that you must access your email account from the same computer every time, if you would like access to all of your messages. Also, if the hard drive on your computer crashes, then you lose all of your saved messages, unless you back them up yourself on a regular basis. POP applications can also be configured to only download email to your home machine at certain intervals.

IMAP vs. POP

IMAP POP
Allows you to check email from multiple machines Best if you’re only checking email from one computer
All of your messages are saved on the server Messages are saved on the hard drive of your computer
Messages are backed up on a regular basis You must back up messages yourself
Your server space can fill up too fast Saves space on your server by downloading messages to your machine


Now we’ll cover some different email clients, and the pros and cons of using each one.

next section >

 

 
© 2004 Sara Fuchs & Holly Robertson | iSchool | UT Austin | webmaster